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10 Astonishing Facts About Mimosa Cocktail

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Introduction

The mimosa is a beloved brunch cocktail made from champagne and orange juice. Light, fizzy, and fruity, the mimosa is the perfect drink to start a leisurely weekend morning. Though the mimosa may seem simple, this sparkling cocktail has some fascinating history and surprising facts behind it.

The mimosa strikes an ideal balance between sweet and tart thanks to the interplay between fruit juices and bubbly. It’s no wonder why the mimosa has become a brunch staple across North America. Below are 10 astonishing facts about the origins, ingredients, and best practices for making and serving this bright libation.

Interesting Facts About Mimosa Cocktails

1. The mimosa was invented in Paris

The mimosa cocktail can trace its origins to the famous Hotel Ritz Paris in the 1920s. Bartender Frank Meier invented the drink as a lighter champagne cocktail option for the female patrons of the Ritz Bar. The Ritz was instrumental in the early popularity of the mimosa.

2. The ratio of ingredients is contentious

There is no universally accepted ratio for the champagne and orange juice ingredients of a mimosa. Common ratios are:

  • 50/50
  • 60% champagne, 40% juice
  • 75% champagne, 25% juice

The ideal ratio comes down to personal preference for the balance of sweet and tart flavors.

Mimosas
Mimosas by allaboutgeorge is licensed under CC BY 2.0 .

3. Not all sparkling wines work

Though champagne is traditional, other sparkling wines can stand in, such as:

  • Cava
  • Prosecco
  • Sparkling white wine

However, very dry champagnes or wines may need extra juice or liqueurs to balance the acidity. Sweeter sparkling wines require less added juice.

4. Vodka can be added for an extra kick

For boozy brunch lovers, a splash of citrus vodka is sometimes added to the mimosa for an extra layer of flavor and strength. This is called a vodka mimosa or mimosa with a kick.

5. Other juices work for creative spins

Though orange is classic, juices like grapefruit, mango, pineapple, pomegranate, or cranberry can be used in place of OJ. These alternate juices put a tropical, berry-filled, or other spin onto the standard mimosa flavor.

6. Purees make gourmet mimosas

Using pureed fruits instead of juice takes the mimosa to elegant new heights. Popular puree options include:

  • Strawberry
  • Peach
  • Apricot
  • Guava
  • Passion fruit

Blending purees with orange juice strikes a nice balance.

7. There are lots of options for garnishes

From fruits on skewers to herbs and spices, creative garnishes can provide bursts of color, aroma, and flavor. Popular easy garnish choices include:

  • Orange slice or wheel
  • Orange zest
  • Mint leaves
  • Cinnamon stick
  • Star anise

8. The flute glass shape highlights bubbles

Tall champagne flutes are the preferred glass for mimosas over wide glasses. The narrow shape contains the effervescence and highlights the delicate bubbles that make the cocktail so light and airy.

9. Mimosas are usually only daytime appropriate

It may be all fun and brunch early on, but drinking mimosas late into the evening is generally seen as excessive. Mimosas are now seen as largely daytime drinks, paired with brunch and lighter daytime affairs.

10. “Bottomless” mimosas are an American concept

Getting refill after refill of mimosas is a luxury largely embraced in North America. The “bottomless” concept allows free refills – with the purchase of a meal. This indulgence is helping to skyrocket the drink’s popularity in the United States.

Conclusion

The mimosa has come a long way from its initial creation in 1920s Parisian high society to its present status as a weekend brunch essential. It’s past time to rethink assumptions about this cocktail as being basic or boring. The vibrant history, variations, and proper presentation of the mimosa give it an enduring sparkle and pop. With so many riffs possible on the classic recipe, every sip can feel like a new concoction. Here’s to keeping the mimosa magic flowing for the next 100 years!


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